Military


Maybe she wasn’t based specifically on Doyle, or the hundreds of other women that served in OSS, SOE, and other agencies during the war, but it’s a worth title.

The young New Zealander Doyle joined Women’s Auxiliary Air Corps in 1941 following the death of her godmother’s father — whom she considered her grandfather — by Nazis. She was quickly recruited into the Special Operations Executive and her most famous exploit was parachuting in behind enemy lines prior to the Normandy invasion, where she posed as a French girl named Paulette. She bicycled around the combat zone selling soap to Germans and collecting intelligence on them. Her 135 messages helped craft the battle plan for D-Day. She frequently lived off the land. Her combat skills were on par with male agents. She was taught by a cat burglar to scale buildings.

She didn’t tell her kids about any of this until 1999 when a son discovered her story while researching D-Day. And just this November, after 70 years, she was awarded the Chevalier French Legion of Honour Medal, one of the highest military awards the French have.

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Then there’s the rest of them…

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You can read more about her here.

Wired has a nice article of the High Energy Laser Mobile Demonstrator (HEL MD) by Boeing being developed for the Army. The system will eventually run a 50-60kW energy weapon, rather than the 10kW here. And controlled with an XBox controller…soon your fat game kid might be able to join the military and shoot stuff from your basement.

Click for video.

 

Phantom Badger Light Assault Vehicle

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The US Navy needed a small, light combat vehicle for reconnaissance, rescue, or combat situations that could be dropped from the V-22 OSprey. What they got was the Phantom Badger by Boeing. It crams a 240hp multi-fuel motor and five personnel into a jeep-like chassis that is just 60 inches wide, barely 13 feet long and has a range of roughly 300 miles.

The Phantom Badger has four wheel drive and steering, allowing for incredibly tight turning radiuses, and can ford up to three foot deep waters, hit 80mph on a paved road, and has interchangeable parts with most other US military vehicles, as well as a modular rear deck that can be reconfigured with a simple wench set.

The craft can either use a .50 caliber M2A1 machinegun on the rollbar behind the driver’s compartment; and two M249 5.56mm SAW for the two rear-facing seats; or it can carry up to six litters for wounded. One can be carried in a V-22, two in a Chinook helicopter or C-130, and ten can fit in a C-17 transport.

PM: +1   RED: 4   CRUS: 50   MAX: 80   RNG: 300   FCE: 2   STR: 5   COST: n/a

GM Information: The Phantom Badger receives a +1EF for off-road conditions. In a roll-over crash, the passengers receive the same damage as the craft, rather than one WL lower.

The X-47B drone just made its first carrier landing. How important is this? Well, the Navy is saying its on par with the first naval aircraft. The craft are remote-piloted, smaller than most naval aircraft (more to a carrier), and are much, much cheaper per unit than most of the hot-shit new fighter designs. Oh, and not having a pilot on board means it can out turn anything in the skies.

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Here’s the first catapult launch of the craft:

And the first landing:

Can Cylon Raiders be far behind..?

Here’s the stats for the X-47B for the James Bond: 007 RPG:

PM: +2   RED: 2   CRUS: 500   MAX: 700   RNG: 2,100   FCE: 5   STR: 25   COST: n/a

GM Information: The X-47’s small profile gives opponents looking for it a -2EF to their Perception. The drone can carry 4500 lbs of missiles or other ordinance.

More here.

Sustained 500 kv (100 kWt) laser developed by the Office of Naval Research. Unlike solid state lasers, it uses electrons from the atmosphere, so it uses less power and can be frequency tuned.

 

The US Air Force is looking to replace the F-22 with a remote-piloted fighter craft (a UCAV) by 2030.  Here’s Boeing’s concept of the vehicle…

And here’s the solicitation sheet.

 

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